The Best Online Tools to Help You Build Your Next PC

Building your own desktop is not as difficult as it sounds – it's often called "LEGO for adults". And although this sentence is a bit condescending (adults can also enjoy LEGO), this is not wrong. Even so, the breadth of choices, options and compatibility issues can be daunting, especially for a first builder. Here is a collection of online tools to help you make sure the process runs as smoothly as possible.

PCPartPicker

PCPartPicker is probably the quintessential service "pick my parts". Start using the tool with one piece, such as a processor or motherboard, and you can search in its massive PC hardware database for components that are compatible with the other parts of your build. This is perfect for someone who is afraid that his $ 300 graphics card will not fit in his $ 100 case. You can also start from any point: if there is a special case or a strangely specific Blu-ray player you want to build, start with that and go crazy.

By default, the site displays the lowest price available from the most popular and reliable online merchants, so you know exactly where to buy for the lowest total price on your build. It also includes many other options, so you can see exactly how much will cost your construction if you want to buy every piece on, say, Newegg, or take into account the free delivery of Amazon Prime. There are also price comparisons and built-in alerts. If you still feel intimidated by the whole process, do not worry: PCPartPicker also includes full versions with pre-selected components and guides to assemble them. If there is a site that you will add to your new PC, do this one.

Logical increments

If you want an easy-to-use graph of the best PC Builder components at any given time for a given budget, Logical Increments is a great site to check out. It is essentially a large, constantly updated spreadsheet, telling you the best possible build for each price range. With its unique layout, it's easy to quickly select an entire room based on your specific budget. It's also great for the extended life of your machine: when you're wondering if it's worth switching to a new GPU or a new power supply, check the latest version to see if it's worth it. sentence. There is also a practical glossary and a guide for all parties under the main graph, if you want something easy to analyze at a glance.

Of course, you do not need to use their exact version, but it's a great way to start and see what a balanced game machine looks like in your budget, and to adjust from there.

CamelCamelCamel

CamelCamelCamel is not specifically a tool for PC builders, but it is nevertheless incredibly convenient for them, especially since cost savings are a big reason for build your own computer in the first place. This price tracking site covers Amazon listings for more or less, and its price history is a great way to know when to buy the part you are looking for. Alert tools can integrate with your Amazon wish list, instantly telling you when this juicy GPU is on sale. Unfortunately, the tool is limited to Amazon only (Newegg has kicked them out of the affiliate program, because Newegg apparently hates money), but it's still a great way to automate shopping on the world's largest market.

How-To Geek (That's Us)

Hey, you know we have a bunch of articles on PC building right here on this website, right? Just do a search on our site for the topic you are looking for (this is at the top of the page). We have what you need for static protection LEDs and accessories for fans coolers for secondary market CPUs Comparisons Mini-ITX the myths that must be destroyed and even a guide to pieces without tools to name a few.

YouTube

The intimidating thing about building a PC is the almost infinite combination of hardware. As much as we like the textual guides here at How-To Geek, sometimes there is no substitute for watching someone perform a task. Enter YouTube . If at any point in the build process you're confused, just do a search for your specific part on YouTube. Chances are incredibly good that someone already has a practical video or review showing exactly how to install or activate it.

Windows download site

The installation of Windows on your computer is not the same as in the past. Microsoft will let you download the operating system create a bootable USB stick install it on a new PC and start using it right away, both that you have access to another Windows or MacOS machine and an internet connection, it's easy as pie. You do not even need a license to run it, and you can use it in free mode with very few restrictions indefinitely. You can update your installation in by purchasing a software key from the Microsoft store at any time if you want to "become legitimate".

PC Construction Simulator

Ok, so this one is not entirely practical, since you need a computer capable of handling at least basic 3D graphics before you can use it. It's also a commercial game, and it will not be available until January 2018. But damn it, it's so cool we can not wait.

PC Building Simulator allows you to build a complete PC, complete with licensed parts and meticulously accurate renderings and spaces. It's a way to virtually go through the whole tedious construction process, to see if all the chosen parts are digitally and physically compatible, without ever buying a single piece of hardware. It even includes virtual PC benchmarks based on your hardware choices!

If you can not wait for the full release (or if you read this in 2018 and you do not want to pay for it), there is a PC Building Simulator demo available now

Source of the image: Amazon Steam,

One Reply to “The Best Online Tools to Help You Build Your Next PC”

  1. Well this is an excellent article. My desktop recently went down with what seems like a motherboard problem. Never heard of PCPartPicker, but it is exactly what I need when I decide to rebuild or repair. Logical Increments and CamelCamelCamel (an annoying name) should also be helful.

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